Monday, May 29, 2017

Election Time Again

It's election time again after our prime minister decided to U-turn and call an early election. I was out delivering leaflets for the Conservatives once again. And once again, I saw another house with a 'shoes-off' sign. This one had the familiar message "Since little hands touch the floor, please remove your shoes at the door."

That's a total of seven shoes-off signs in houses in Stevenage that I have counted, not including my own. Clearly people in Stevenage are getting the message and like to keep their homes clean.

Stevenage is quite a working-class town, so this fits with what I said recently about upper-working class people favouring shoes-off, that is, skilled manual workers and trades people. They are probably more likely to ask for shoes-off than posher middle-class people.

Saturday, May 27, 2017

Supervision with my shoes off

I had a supervision session with my line manager where she reviews my work and performance. We couldn't find a room to use, so we decided to go outside, as it was sunny. My boss suggested sitting under a shady tree, so I got my picnic blanket out of the car. We thus had our session sitting on the picnic blanket with our shoes off.

It seemed perhaps a little surreal to be reviewing my performance sat on a picnic blanket, but it was a nice change. Perhaps it might seem a little overly familiar, though my line manager did come to the housewarming party in my apartment a while ago (and complied with my no-shoes rule).

Sunday, May 21, 2017

Diana Elizabeth Blog: How to enforce a no shoe policy with guests

Diana Elizabeth Blog: How to enforce a no shoe policy with guests

"So maybe you might need some help to tell new guests about your no shoe policy, or you may decide your new home will now be a shoe-free zone. So how do you enforce it, politely?

Before I get started, please remember you aren’t going to lose friends over asking them to take off their shoes – really. And anyone who has that much of an attachment to their shoes might have some feet issues or something. Just kidding. So don’t worry about the request – your guests would rather abide by your rules than make the host uncomfortable!"

Sunday, May 14, 2017

MEL Magazine: Don’t Get Mad When the Hosts Asks You to Remove Your Shoes

MEL Magazine: Don’t Get Mad When the Hosts Asks You to Remove Your Shoes

"Yes, it’s annoying when someone asks you to take off your shoes before you’re allowed to step inside their home. But it’s also annoying (and painful and embarrassing) to contract some form of explosive diarrhea, which is something that can happen when germs from the street are tracked all over a kitchen or bedroom floor.

In fact, a study conducted by Charles Gerba, a microbiologist at the University of Arizona, found more than 421,000 units of bacteria on the outside of the average pair of shoes. What’s worse, it found that the transfer rate from a contaminated place to a previously uncontaminated place — e.g., that dive bar bathroom to your bathroom — was 90 to 99 percent. In other words, what was on the floor of that restroom is now almost definitely in yours."

Loic Le Meur: Can you please remove your shoes?

Loic Le Meur: Can you please remove your shoes?

"Yesterday I had a few friends at my new place. I decided to ask them to remove their shoes as they entered the house. It created all kinds of conversations and surprises.

I think it’s standard in many places in Asia but almost never in France and I have rarely seen it in San Francisco. The benefit is obvious — keep your house clean from all the crap your shoes carry with them."

Monday, May 01, 2017

The Journal| Poll: Do you ask visitors to remove their shoes in your home?

The Journal| Poll: Do you ask visitors to remove their shoes in your home?


"YESTERDAY WE BROUGHT you news of scientific studies which show that outdoor shoes carry some seriously nasty bugs.

A slight majority of readers who voted in our poll on the issue say they take they shoes off indoors.

On foot of that (sorry), a few of you suggested that we should follow the example of other cultures and ask visitors to also remove their shoes on entering our homes."


Discussion of our favorite topic on an Irish website. Despite the damp weather, shoe-free homes are not the norm in Ireland, nevertheless quite a few comments from Irish people who do prefer shoes-off. Some of the comments are a bit on the daft side.