Sunday, November 23, 2014

SKCheung: Should Guests Lose Their Shoes at My House Party?

SKCheung: Should Guests Lose Their Shoes at My House Party?

'It is your home and whether you want the guests to keep their shoes or not, it’s your choice. You don’t want high heels or spiked heels marring your recently finished hardwood flooring, of course. The key here is to make sure you let guests know of what you expect so that everyone can still have a good time shoeless or not at your house. You’re the host but you still owe it to the guests for coming, so make them feel warm and welcome!'

EcoNovice: Is Your Home Shoeless? 3 Critical Reasons to Leave Shoes at the Door

EcoNovice: Is Your Home Shoeless? 3 Critical Reasons to Leave Shoes at the Door

'As we enter the winter months and the holidays, keeping shoes out of your home can become a little more challenging. But the benefits are worth it! Removing your shoes (and encouraging your guests to do likewise) reduces the amount of toxic pollutants in your home, decreases the time and money you spend on cleaning, and promotes the development of healthier stronger feet.'

Monday, November 17, 2014

20s/ 30s Conference

This weekend I attended a charismatic evangelical conference for people in their twenties and thirties. I noticed that about a third of the delegates at the conference had their shoes off during the worship sessions. That sort of seems normal for people that age. Maybe in a generation or two it will be the norm to take one's shoes off in church.

Sunday, November 09, 2014

Today's Parent: Shoes on or off?: A surprisingly contentious issue

Today's Parent: Shoes on or off?: A surprisingly contentious issue

Article by Emma Waverman

'When you enter another person’s home, is it shoes on or shoes off? It’s a surprisingly contentious issue and, as we near the holiday season, one that merits discussion.

I grew up in a household where shoe removal was not mandatory—and it still isn’t with my family. If your shoes are dry and complement your outfit, then they can stay on, so long as they’re not on the furniture.'

However, I didn’t realize how strongly divided people were about footwear. For example, a woman living in Great Britain runs a blog called Shoes Off at the Door, Please which lists 37 reasons why people should remove their shoes when entering a house. She lists cleanliness and safeguarding the floors, but also that it simply creates a “more relaxing atmosphere.”'



I appreciate the mention. Of course, she is not the first person to wrongly assume I'm a lady.

Wednesday, November 05, 2014

Congratulations to Bruce Rauner

Congratulations to Bruce Rauner, the new Republican governor of Illinois. I had mentioned a little while ago that Mr. Rauner and his wife have a shoes-off policy in their house. That's a domestic policy that shows good sense.

I hope they keep up the no-shoes rule in the governor's mansion.

Monday, November 03, 2014

Syrian Rebel



The front cover of the Independent featured a photograph of a rebel fighter in Syria. I love the fact that this rebel has removed his shoes before crouching on a mattress to fire a gun. Such perfect etiquette.

Saturday, November 01, 2014

Daily Mail: Millions of Britons could be at risk from pneumonia, E. Coli and salmonella from filthy rugs

Daily Mail: Millions of Britons could be at risk from pneumonia, E. Coli and salmonella from filthy rugs

Millions of Britons could be at risk of life-threatening diseases from an unlikely source - their filthy carpets.
Unclean rugs can contain a shocking level of disease-inducing bacteria, according to research released today.
After swabbing the shoes of people of various ages across the UK, scientists found high levels of bacteria from the pneumonia and E.Coli families.



Yahoo Answers: Is it rude to ask female visitors to take their stiletto heels off at the door to protect the wood floors?

Yahoo Answers: Is it rude to ask female visitors to take their stiletto heels off at the door to protect the wood floors?

And Her Little Dog: No Shoes – Baby on the Loose

And Her Little Dog: No Shoes – Baby on the Loose


'So yesterday we did something a little different.

Our house became a shoe-free zone.

Ok, ok. Not entirely shoe-free. I still have my entire closet full of my favorite footwear. But we decided that we were no longer going to allow shoes to be worn in our home. From now on, you have to take your shoes off at the front door!'

Sunday, October 19, 2014

Home.Health.Love: Why You Should Have a No-Shoe Policy at Home

Home.Health.Love: Why You Should Have a No-Shoe Policy at Home

'Since having kids, we’ve instituted a no-shoe policy in our house. My three-year-old daughter is so used to this, that she immediately takes off her shoes whenever we go to someone else’s home, and she’ll often ask me why others aren’t doing the same.

I always find it awkward to ask guests to remove their shoes and it feels like an imposition. They just arrived and here I am making a demand of them! I am aware of the nuisance, but I have good reasons for it.

Studies have shown that people track in all sorts of harmful toxins from outside the home when they walk into the house without removing their shoes. These toxins persist in the air in the form of dust, which is inhaled and absorbed by our skin as it settles on the floor and furniture. Chemicals stay in the air and on surfaces longer in our homes than they do outdoors, where the sun and rain help break down pesticide residues.'

Pretty Handy Girl: Remove Your Shoes at the Door

Pretty Handy Girl: Remove Your Shoes at the Door

'Want to cut down on your vacuuming? Want to make your carpets last 10 times longer? Want to keep bacteria out of your home? Wow, sounds like a miracle product right? Actually you can accomplish all of the above by simply training yourself and your family to remove their shoes at the door.'

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Daily Mom: TIPS ON MAINTAINING HOUSE RULES WITH GUESTS

Daily Mom: TIPS ON MAINTAINING HOUSE RULES WITH GUESTS

This is probably the most difficult house rule for people to maintain with guests, simply because many find it awkward to ask. But if this is a house rule that is important to your family (And it should be! To find out why, check out “One Simple Step That Can Keep Your Child Healthy”), it’s vital to maintain it with anyone who walks through your door.



Chicago Sun-Times: Will Rauner’s shoe rules follow him to Springfield mansion?

Chicago Sun-Times: Will Rauner’s shoe rules follow him to Springfield mansion?

'Hmmm. News GOP gubernatorial gazillionaire Bruce Rauner and his wife, Diana — who own nine homes — plan to actually reside in the governor’s mansion in Springfield if he wins prompts Sneed to ask this question.

Will the ramshackle mansion they plan to fix up be off-limits for . . . um, shoes?

As Sneed noted awhile back, Mrs. Rauner doesn’t like shoes worn in the house.'



Apparently Bruce Rauner, the Republican candidate for governor of Illinois has a shoes-off policy. Good for him and Mrs. Rauner. I hope he does implement it in the governor's mansion in the event of his being elected.

The Stir: I Ask People to Take Off Their Shoes in My House -- So What?

The Stir: I Ask People to Take Off Their Shoes in My House -- So What?

'About eight years ago, right around the time our daughter was born, my husband and I instituted a "shoes off" policy in our home. It seemed pretty minor at the time. All we asked was that guests not track the mud, dirt, and mess from the outside world into the house where our baby spent so much time on the floor.

With certain visitors, though, this was no simple feat (get it? hee). In fact, some -- I'm looking at you, Dad -- simply ignored the request and chose instead to traipse around the house, tracking all that mud, dirt, and everywhere. Thanks a lot!

Apparently, we are not alone. Whether or not to ask guests to take off their shoes is, as it turns out, a controversial move. Many moms (here at CafeMom and elsewhere) think it's the height of rudeness to require your friends and family to go around in their socks or bare feet. It's not. What's rude is ignoring a house rule when you're the guest because YOU don't feel like untying your laces.

The fact is, it IS a health hazard to have people wear their shoes inside your house. Even if you have hardwood floors like we do.'

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Stats

Looking at the stats, this blog seems to be getting a lot of visits from readers in France. Maybe removing shoes at the door is a hot topic over there.

Would any of our French visitors care to comment?

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Food For Thought: Having A "No Shoe" Home Rule



Some great advice about having a shoe-free home. British people need more of this lady's assertive attitude.

Sunday, August 10, 2014

Kate Gosselin

Apparently the American television personality Kate Gosselin has a no-shoes rule. She requires this of the camera crew filiming the reality show about her lifestyle, Jon & Kate Plus 8:

Kate Gosselin’s Supposedly ‘Strict’ Rules For Her Show’s Crew Are Actually Very Reasonable

Friday, August 01, 2014

Bucking the Trend in Sheffield

More on the Turtle Mat survey:

The Star: Sheffield named one of most house proud cities


According to a study of domestic standards, 71 per cent of the city’s residents remove their shoes in their own home, and more than half would ask guests to do so too.



I suppose northerners are more candid. If they want you to take your shoes off, they won't mince their words. Good for people in Sheffield.

The Turtle Mat Survey

Turtle Mat Blog: Turtle Mat 2014 Houseproud Survey

A survey by the doormat copany Turtle Map surveyed British towns to find out how likely British people were to remove their shoes and ask guests to remove their shoes. The results are a little unsurprising, with the South being the most houseproud in general. One interesting result though, was that while women were overall more likely than men to remove their shoes, men were more likely to ask guests to take their shoes off.

On the whole, it identified the British norm as I have described it here, that most British people take their shoes off in their own homes, but would not require guests to do the same. This contrasts with Sweden or Norway, where guests would be expected to remove their shoes and also with Spain and Italy, where most people keep their shoes on in their own homes. I suspect the results of a similar survey in America would show a sharp polarisation between people who keep their shoes on and people who require shoes off for guests, with less of the British comproise approach.

I'm not sure I like the tone of the way the results were presented, with the implied suggestion that asking for shoes off is impolite or unwelcoing. What is impolite or unwelcoming about asking people to do what they would do in their own homes anyway? I suspect a not-so hidden agenda; it's certainly in the interests of a doormat manufactuer for people to wear shoes indoors, then they will spend more money on expensive doorats.

What do they do in Worcester?

Those of you who followed this blog in the early days might be aware I used to live in Worcester. It seems like such a long time since those days. I found this:

Worcester: Welcome to Friendly Worcester

The study, by Turtle Mat, primarily examined nationwide attitudes to cleanliness, judged on the number of people who take their shoes off when in their own home and ask guests to do the same.

And in a quintessentially British trait the majority of people always take their shoes off when in their own homes, but a lot are too polite to ask guests to do the same.

This trend was true for Worcester with 85 percent of people saying they always remove their shoes in their own home but almost two thirds would not ask guests to follow suit.

This is such a typically British stance. Taking one's own shoes off, but not minding guests coming in with shoes on. I think I prefer bolshy Americans who insist on shoes off for everybody who steps past the door.